¡Tierras para los Pueblos! Venustiano Carranza, Primer Jefe del Ejercito Constitucionalista, Encargado del Poder Ejecutivo de la Republica Mexicana y Jefe de la Revolcion, en Uso de las Facultades de Que Se Halla Investido, y Considerando... [caption title]. Mexican Revolution.

¡Tierras para los Pueblos! Venustiano Carranza, Primer Jefe del Ejercito Constitucionalista, Encargado del Poder Ejecutivo de la Republica Mexicana y Jefe de la Revolcion, en Uso de las Facultades de Que Se Halla Investido, y Considerando... [caption title]

[Veracruz? 1915]. Large broadside, approximately 24 x 17 inches. Previously folded. Minor wear and dust soiling at edges. Weak along folds, with some separation along horizontal folds and a couple of minor losses at fold points, only affecting one or two letters. A few unobtrusive tape repairs on blank verso. Even tanning, a couple small patches of staining. Good plus. Item #1625

Rare broadside printing of the Mexican Agrarian Law of 1915, a significant if ultimately ineffectual milestone of efforts toward land reform during the Mexican Revolution in the 1910s. The overwhelming loss of peasant, village, and indigenous lands to large estates and business interests in Mexico during the long reign of Porfirio Diaz was a key impetus for the Revolution, but the Consitutionalist faction that emerged victorious in 1915 with Venustiano Carranza, a wealthy land owner, as president, was disinclined to proclaim sweeping reforms that would forcibly reappropriate large amounts of land for peasant use. Instead, they sought to craft a law that would mollify uprisings still led by Pancho Villa and Emiliano Zapata, who now opposed the government, but also would also satisfy the landed classes. The decree printed here promised a reestablishment of the ejidos, community-controlled lands, and outlined an extensive bureaucracy to study claims and to order expropriations. In practice, however, confiscations and redistribution of land occurred mostly where it would be politically advantageous to quiet rebellious towns or potential supporters of Villa and Zapata, and much of this property was even returned to previous owners after Carranza became the constitutional President of the country in 1917. We locate only one copy of this scarce broadside, at Yale.

Price: $1,250.00

See all items by