Testimony about the Perry Land Grant in Honduras Owned by the Honduras Company, Owings Building, 215 to 219 Dearborn Street, Chicago. Honduras Company.
Testimony about the Perry Land Grant in Honduras Owned by the Honduras Company, Owings Building, 215 to 219 Dearborn Street, Chicago

Testimony about the Perry Land Grant in Honduras Owned by the Honduras Company, Owings Building, 215 to 219 Dearborn Street, Chicago

[Chicago]: 1891. 88,[8]pp.; with a map titled "Town of Perry 100 Hectares," 16 x 11 inches. 12mo. Original green printed wrappers. Minor wear and soiling, contemporary ink stamp on front cover. Internally clean. Map with old folds, minor wear. Very good plus. Item #1113

A testimonial work promoting the Perry Land Grant, organized under the auspices of the Honduras Company in 1890.
Edward W. Perry served as the company's first president, in addition to being one of its directors and Governor of La Mosquitia, a tropical rainforest region where the town of Perry was laid out. The land grant was located “...900 miles south of New Orleans, and is nearer to Chicago than are the fruit fields of California.” Perry’s agreement with the government of Honduras allowed the purchase in exchange for making “...extensive public works which will prove of inestimable value to the entire eastern half of the republic.” Improvements were to include roads, telegraph lines, and a canal. Testimony about the Perry Land Grant in Honduras includes descriptions of the geography and climate as well as information on its agricultural prospects and expected outlays for emigrants or investors, and notes on crops and the legal situation. Numerous testimonials are included (one concerning gold mining) as well as travel directions and information concerning land surveys.

Laid in -- and apparently unrecorded -- is a plat map of the proposed settlement located on the Patuca River in northeastern Honduras. The plat map shows the 100 hectare Town of Perry with its residential districts of “Wood Lawn” and “Morton Park,” a wharf, and river-side plantations. The map indicates that purchasers of the plantations are entitled to town plots, as well: "Every 25 hectares of land entitles the purchaser to a town lot, front E. or W. Alternate lots reserved by the Company." Morton Park is possibly named for one A.H. Morton, a likely agent of The Honduras Company, whose name is stamped on the upper cover.

Rare and interesting. We locate three copies in OCLC, at the Newberry, University of Kansas, and University of Missouri.

Price: $850.00